Wedding photography with the Sony A7III

Wedding photography with the Sony A7III

Hi, My name is Kevin – Wadkin Photography.  I switched from Nikon to Sony 9 months ago, and I have never looked back. I recently picked up the new A7iii and I have been using it a lot over the last few months. The main feature of this camera that I fell in love with is its size and power! Due to the documentary style of wedding photography I practice, I feel it’s more important that I know my camera inside out.
The other key feature of the A7iii, and why I chose it over any of the others in the A7Rii line-up, was the auto focus speed! Wow Amazing!. I’m still shooting with an Sony a7Rii, but with the higher 42mp resolution I found this was a problem when loading my files into Lightroom.
 
For me, one of the key features of the A7iii was the low light ISO. I wanted to be able to shoot much more freely during the ceremony, without worrying about grainy images at high ISO.
The other key feature of the A7iii, and why I chose it over any of the others in the A7Rii lineup, was the auto focus speed! Wow Amazing!
Other features that I’ve really started to appreciate since shooting with the camera, include it’s size and weight, the electronic viewfinder, the Zeiss lenses and the articulating LCD screen, all of which I’ll write about in a bit more detail later in the post.
 
The images below are just a small selection from my photography shoot with the Sony A7iii.
 
The camera body and feature set of the A7lll is nearly identical to the A7Rlll that was released last year. It’s major point of difference from the A7III is it’s 24.2 Megapixel backlit illuminated sensor that features 693 phase detect autofocus points (PDAF). The camera is capable of the same 10 frames per second in Continuous Hi+ drive mode but has the larger spread of PDAF points that the A9 enjoys. This model is significantly cheaper than an A9 or A7RIII cameras (less than half the price of an A9 and approximately 40% less than an A7RIII). Many of the early influencers who reviewed this camera decided to promote the strengths of this camera at the expense of Sony’s own full-frame premium mirrorless cameras (the A7RIII and the A9). It would, however, make much more sense to first compare this camera with DSLR cameras that retail at the same price point and the previous A7II model. Owners of the A7 and A7II cameras may notice there has been a steady improvement in image quality (IQ) with each subsequent model. Dynamic Range and High ISO Performance are both superior on the A7III model, it should also be noted, however, that IQ was already outstanding, so many users who upgrade to the A7III camera won’t be shocked or surprised at the difference in image quality.
 
To play this video, view this post from your live site.
 
 
Seeing in the Dark: High ISO Performance
Much has already been written online about the incredible high ISO performance of the A7s (and it’s all true). While I’m not averse to using flash later in the day, the ability to shoot in such low light without it, has certainly added another dimension to my photography. It both allows me to shoot more frames without the subject becoming away of my presence, and creates a more harmonious transition between images from earlier in the day and those taken after dark.
The two images above were shot at ISO12600. The church was reasonably lit, but the low light performance of the A7iii made this an easy shoot.
 
 
So impressed was I with the Carl Zeiss 35mm f/2.8 and 55mm f/1.8 lenses that soon after the Batis 85mm f/1.8 was announced, I decided I wanted to add it to my kit. As if by magic, it arrived just before a run of winter weddings when the maximum f/1.8 aperture and image stabilization turned out to be real lifesavers. The last of my wedding photography with the Sony A7s in this post are all shot with the Batis 85mm over the Christmas period. All were shot at either f/1.8 or f/2.
In Conclusion
YES! I love this camera. When I bought the camera a few months ago, the switch from my trusty A7Rii was like choosing between your parents… BUT I’m not regretting my move to Sony for a minute!
No Comments

Post A Comment